People in California regardless of their gender need to work in order to earn an income. Most of these jobs can be done equally well by either men or women. However, historically and still today women are paid less than men doing the same jobs. This is a clear sign of how gender discrimination has negatively affected women and how difficult it is to change these trends that are rooted deep within the workforce.

The wage gap between men and women has been well-documented, but the discrimination goes even further than that. Women occupy fewer executive and senior management positions than men. This is another way that companies are keeping women from having the same economic opportunities as men.

Statistics demonstrate that women have 60 percent of all the master’s degrees in the U.S. and have 52 percent of the professional level jobs, but they have only 25 percent of all executive and senior level positions at major corporations, only 20 percent of the board positions and only 6 percent of the CEO positions. Women also only represent 18 percent of equity partners at law firms despite representing 45 percent of the associate positions. Even at colleges and universities they only represent 31 percent of professors and 27 percent of college presidents.

The statistics show that women should be more than qualified to hold the top positions at companies, but clearly are not afforded the same opportunities as men. This could be a sign of gender discrimination that seems to cross into many different fields of work. If these women are the victims of gender discrimination in hiring or promotions, they may be able to pursue compensation for their lack of opportunity.

While the overall attitude towards the wage gap and lack of women in leadership is changing in California, the statistics show there is still a long way to go. Women who feel that their lack of opportunity is due to discrimination may want to seek compensation for the damages they suffered.