There are many factors that go into why companies in California make decisions regarding hiring, pay, promotions and other aspects of the job. For the most part it is based on a workers job performance or credentials, but sometimes other factors are used instead. This could be that the supervisor is giving a favor to a family member or friend or other reasons such as gender discrimination. Neither of these are fair ways of making decisions, but only discrimination is illegal.

While on the surface it may seem that gender discrimination only really affects the employee or class of employees that are being discriminated against, but discrimination can affect the whole company.

One effect is that the company may experience a high turnover rate because employees who are discriminated against will not want to stay. This increases costs of hiring and training new employees frequently. Discrimination also keeps employee morale low and motivation and production may suffer as a result. It also creates conflict among the employees who may be less likely to work together, which can have detrimental effects on production as well.

Finally gender discrimination can result in legal action. As stated above gender discrimination is illegal and employees are protected against it. Employees who experience gender discrimination can file complaints against the company. This results in expensive legal costs for the company as well as having to pay the employee damages such as back pay, future pay, the employee’s legal costs and other damages.

There are many employees in California who experience gender discrimination in the workplace. This is illegal and no matter whether the employee is at-will or not, these employees have rights and may be entitled to compensation for this. These cases are sometimes difficult to prove though, but it is important employees receive what they deserve. Consulting with an experienced attorney may be helpful.

Source: women.thenest.com, “The effects of discrimination in the workplace” Ellie Williams accessed on April 24, 2018