Is your employer violating California wage and hour laws? Just as federal laws protect you and other workers from unlawful employer behaviors when it comes to pay rates, overtime pay and more, California wage and hour laws extend these protections even further. But what do these laws entail, and how do you know if your employer is actually breaking the law?

This article will answer common questions about wage and hour laws in California to help you understand if your employer may be violating California’s wage and hour laws.

Is your employer violating California wage and hour laws? Just as federal laws protect you and other workers from unlawful employer behaviors when it comes to pay rates, overtime pay and more, California wage and hour laws extend these protections even further. But what do these laws entail, and how do you know if your employer is actually breaking the law?

This article will answer common questions about wage and hour laws in California to help you understand if your employer may be violating California’s wage and hour laws.

Wage and Hour Laws in California: Your Questions, Answered

What are California wage and hour laws?

California wage and hour laws cover everything from overtime work and pay, minimum wage requirements, tips, meal breaks, rest breaks, what actually qualifies as time worked, when an employer must pay you, and more. Under California law, workers’ rights to compensation for time worked are generally offer greater protection than in most other U.S. states.

In addition to federal wage and hour law, the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), California wage and hour laws are governed by the California Labor Code and State Wage Orders. Plus, some local governments (cities, counties) offer their own unique protections.

What is the Wage Theft Protection Act?

The Wage Theft Protection act of 2011, or Assembly Bill 469,added Labor Code section 2810.5. This addition to California labor code requires that all private employers in California must provide each nonexempt employee with a written notice containing specified information at the time of hire.

According to the bill, the notice must also be in the language the employer typically uses to communicate employment-related information to the employee, and the Labor Commissioner must provide every California employer with a template that complies with the notice requirements.

What is the minimum wage in California?

Effective January 1, 2016, almost every employee working in the state of California must be paid at least $10.00 per hour. While some employees are exempt from the minimum wage law (outside salespersons, individuals who are immediate family members of the employer, apprentices, etc.), most employees in California should be making at least the minimum wage as required by law.

In addition to the aforementioned exceptions, there are also others such as employees who are mentally or physically disabled who work with non-profit organizations like sheltered workshops or rehabilitation facilities that employ disabled workers. But the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement must authorize wages that are less than the legal minimum wage. You can learn more about these exceptions and others here.

How much is overtime pay in California?

California wage and hour laws also require that all nonexempt employees be paid overtime if they work more than eight hours in any workday or over forty hours in any workweek – whichever is greater. Employers must pay overtime, whether authorized or not, at the rate of one and one-half times an employee’s regular rate of pay.

When do you get paid double time in California?

If you’ve worked 12 hours in one workday, your employer must also pay you double time for all hours worked in excess of those first 12 hours. In addition to that, if you work on a seventh consecutive day, you are entitled to time and half for the first eight hours of work, plus double time for additional hours worked on that seventh day.

Not every job is entitled to overtime, however. Click here to learn more about California overtime pay laws.

Do you have more questions about California wage and hour laws? Let us know in the comments.

Wage and Hour Laws in California: Additional Information

  • California Employment Laws & Federal Holidays: 5 Things Every Employee Should Know
  • California Labor Code Section 2810.5
  • California Overtime Laws: What Exempt and Nonexempt Employees Should Know
  • Filing a Wage and Hour Claim – California via WorkplaceFairness.org
  • Wage Theft Protection Act via State of California Department of Industrial Relations

If you feel your employer is violating California wage and hour laws, contact the expert employment law attorneys at Hennig Ruiz and let us help you build your case today.